Shallow Waves

Stuff that matters

It could cost £400,000 a year to monitor Osama bin Laden’s former spin doctor.

Counter-terror police and MI5 will have to keep tabs on Adel Abdel Bary as he settles back in the UK after being freed in the US.

Officials were unable to block Bary’s return because he successfully sought asylum here in 1997.

Bary, 60, was implicated in the 1998 bombings of US embassies in Tanzania and Kenya which killed 224.

They were masterminded by bin Laden, responsible for the 9/11 attacks in New York.

An ex-military intelligence officer said: “They will want to know who he talks to, how does he communicate and what are his intentions.

“This may cost three or four hundred thousand a year.

“He may have to be monitored discreetly for several years.”

The father-of-six has been reunited with wife Ragaa, 59, who lives in a £1million council home in North-West London.

‘Too fat’

The Mirror reported today how Abdel-Bary is back in Britain after being freed because he is ‘too fat’ to be behind bars during the Covid-19 pandemic.

Abdel-Bary, who weighs 16.5 stone, won early “mercy” release from a prison in New Jersey after moaning that his life was at risk from coronavirus due to his obesity and asthma.

His son is an ISIS jihadi rapper recently seized in Spain.

British officials cannot send him back to Egypt because it would breach his human rights due to the risk of torture or death there.

In October, it was reported that David Cameron’s government struck a deal with the US to accept bin Laden’s former spokesman back to the UK after his release from jail, for fear of breaching his rights as a political refugee.

A security source revealed how Abdel-Bary’s return “remains a huge headache for the Home Secretary.”

They added: “She is intent on ridding the country of threats, but here’s a notorious terrorist dumped right on her doorstep.”

Sources claimed he will likely claim benefits and be granted security monitoring for his safety, costing the taxpayer tens of thousands.

His immigration lawyer, Andrew Painter, told the New York Times in November: “After all this time, all Mr Bary wants is to enjoy a quiet life with his family.”